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Memory 'Buy' The Numbers
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Doctor Feelgood
Arrrrghh!


Joined: 07 Apr 2003
Posts: 20348
Location: New Jersey

PostPosted: Mon, 23 May 2005 06:49:13    Post Subject: Memory 'Buy' The Numbers Reply with quote View Single Post

In this article I will start with the basics of how computer memory works, what kinds of computer memory is available, and some general recommendations on how much you should need. While I canít possibly go over all possible scenarios and types of memory out there, by the time you have read this article you should hopefully be able to fill in the gaps, and make decisions on your own. - The Article


Last edited by Doctor Feelgood on Fri, 28 Apr 2006 13:58:37; edited 1 time in total
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Little Bruin
Boo Boo

Joined: 07 Apr 2003
Posts: 667
Location: Pic-A-Nic Basket
GIBSON
Rated PG


Joined: 28 May 2005
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Sat, 28 May 2005 09:10:13    Post Subject: Reply with quote View Single Post

in the article you mention that transfers occur on both the rise and fall of the clock cycle, and you explain that with AC-current. But, if i'm not mistaken, aren't computers running on DC-current? Atleast, that is why we need to buy a psu right, and as the ram is in the motherboard slots which gets dc-current, i'm quite sure the ram uses dc too
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Doctor Feelgood
Arrrrghh!


Joined: 07 Apr 2003
Posts: 20348
Location: New Jersey

PostPosted: Sat, 28 May 2005 09:12:55    Post Subject: Reply with quote View Single Post

Hi GIBSON, welcome!

You are correct, all the components in a typical PC are running off of DC current... Although he can correct me when he sees this, I think the author was just using the reference to AC as an analogy to explain the process of transfers with DDR.
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BeerCheeze
*hick*


Joined: 14 Jun 2003
Posts: 9285
Location: At the Bar

PostPosted: Sat, 28 May 2005 10:12:50    Post Subject: Reply with quote View Single Post

Hi Gib... and yea, I probably used it to illustrate my point incorrectly. A PSU (Power Supply Unit) does convert the 120V AC that comes from the wall to DC current (12v, 5v, 3.3v).

Because I'm not an electrical engineer, I'm not qualified to go into depth about electricity. However here is my feeble attempt.... One of the prime differences between AC and DC currents is that the current is Alternating in AC, meaning that (in America for example) the positive and the negative alternate 60 times a second. DC current the positive is always positive and negative is always negative.

However that only talks about the flow, not the magnitude of the current. And it's the rising and falling of the magnitude of the current where DDR operates. If you want more in depth than that... your gonna have to go see your electrician Grin
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GIBSON
Rated PG


Joined: 28 May 2005
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Sat, 04 Jun 2005 12:04:32    Post Subject: Reply with quote View Single Post

lol, well, thnx for the replies (yes, i know this must be nearly a week ago now, but i put on the option to mail me if i got any replies but i guess it doesn't work, anyhow i read the article bout the amd and intel sockets today and then i thought about that post i made so i thought to check it out again Smile)
well, i'm not an electrical engineer either, but when i read your artical i felt there was this contradiction in it and i thought to let it know Smile
greets, GIBSON
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